To collect a flower, and keep it alive—you must first capture its roots.  Something of David Threnody’s roots has been captured here.  The non-linear and cyclical origins in his music.  The time before his birth.  Something of his brothers—his older brothers—what happened to Gerald.  His mother and father.  And going down to Mississippi that first time—the prophecy made over him…  Now we are to the war, the summer of 1941, when David volunteered to join the Army.  This after his first paid performance at a Soulard Mardi Gras, and the performances after, living in a tenement house inEast St. Louis.  The friendships he made with other musicians then, other performers he played with.  And now we are to the war, and his war-time friend—Johnny Tribout—and what happened then, what happened in Tribout’s involvement with the base commander’s daughter before the American involvement in the war in Europe, in the Pacific afterPearl Harbor.  How David had a chance to join the Tuskegee Airman, but lost the opportunity, enlisted in an anti-tank battalion instead.  This because of what happened with Johnny Tribout, how he served on the European front as well, and how David Threnody saved his life.

            You must first capture the roots.  And perhaps some more of these roots will be captured in the movies that follow, the mind movies David imagined based on the conflicting stories he heard from Johnny and what the girl had to say—Nina—the daughter, about Johnny’s amorous relations with her.  Mind movies of that time spent in Biloxi in the summer of 1941, reflecting on what happened to David before, when he came to Mississippi before, to that crossroads—searching for an answer to his question, sleeping in Rosie’s bed.  And perhaps that flower will be kept alive.  That flowering of David’s mind then—the inspirations that led to his music at the time, a time when he was coming into his prime, and perhaps feeling too much, feeling too much at one time.  For he was starting to realize the cause of his shyness—why he was shy as a child.  Discouraged even though he shouldn’t have been.  You see even though Cleota and Duke loved him, perhaps they loved him too much.  His mother’s worries a negative implication in everything he tried.  His father’s severe judgments and disappointing lack of interest in David’s musical ambitions in an attempt to steer him in another direction, biased by his own goals for David’s life, something that haunted him always.  The truth was he was a vain child.  And he became a vain man.  This is what happens with too much attention—too much negative attention.  Seemingly trivial doubts become monumental, and thus the attempts to overcome them become monumental as well.  His parents raised David to be introspective because they forced introspection upon him.  In the driving need they fed in him to change, to become better—because they loved him—perhaps too much.  Because shyness is driven by two contradictory forces—the desire to be unnoticed, anonymous–for fear of failing, embarrassment–and the desire that if you are noticed, the attention drawn upon you finds perfection—that what people find is something perfect, something special…  It drives what you seek in friendship.  In being a friend and having a friend.  Which maybe explains what happened that summer of 1941.  In David Threnody’s friendship with Johnny Tribout, and what happened after in the war…  And so now the curtain rises…

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